Teeth-Friendly Fruits & Vegetables No. 6: [Orange]

tdo-6

 

Oral hygiene is very important to our overall health. For those with braces, careful cleaning is even more important. However, we can do more for our teeth than just brush, floss, and have periodic fluoride treatments. What we eat also has a huge impact on the health of our gums and teeth alike.

Read more…

Favorite Toothbrush

Learn to Let Go of your Favorite Toothbrush

Orthodontist

Tooth brushing Mistake No.10: “Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough”

You might have a favorite toothbrush that you have used for years and just love the color and the feel of it, but this might not be the right thing to do. Old toothbrushes do not do your teeth any favors at all. The bristles become worn down and distorted and even fall out – leaving you with a matted mass of thriving bacteria that are just waiting to chew into your teeth.

Read more…

Bacteria

Bacteria Love Moist Spaces

Orthodontist

Tooth brushing Mistake No.9: “Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry” 

It might be a surprise to you but the care of your toothbrush is extremely important. In fact, it is almost as important as the teeth cleaning process itself. Once you have finished your morning brushing and flossing session, you will most likely throw the used floss out with the trash but certainly not the toothbrush. Many people may leave it dripping wet on the side of the hand basin ready for its evening clean. That is what you certainly should not do.

Read more…

Toothbrush

Rinsing Your Toothbrush: Effective Bacteria Busting Technique

Orthodontist

Tooth brushing Mistake No.8: “Not Following up with a Rinse” 

You may think that once you have piled your toothbrush with peppermint smelling, fluoridated toothpaste that your toothbrush is now so well disinfected that bacteria couldn’t hope to escape wherever they happen to be hiding.  This is far from the truth. Bacteria are a lot more resilient than that. The worst thing you can do with a toothbrush is to hang it out to dry without giving it a rinse in warm water first. Most of that fluoridated toothpaste was transferred to your mouth via your toothbrush. When you spit it all out, there is little remaining on your toothbrush to deter the bacteria.

Read more…

Brushing

Bacteria are Experts at Hiding: Don’t Skip Any Part during Brushing

Orthodontics

Tooth brushing Mistake No.7: “Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces”

Tooth brushing is a holistic task and is designed to ensure that teeth are thoroughly cleaned within the recommended two minutes that it takes to undertake the job well. Skipping over the front surface of your teeth, both front and rear, is not what is called a good teeth cleaning job. Places where you don’t clean, plaque and bacteria will thrive and the end result will be cavity formation and tooth decay. In the long run, this will lead to tooth loss and expensive tooth restorative treatment – and all because in your routine teeth brushing event you did not bother to clean the inner surfaces of your teeth.

Read more…

Tooth Brushing

Common Tooth Brushing Mistakes

Orthodontist

Tooth brushing Mistake No.6: “Starting in the Same Place Each Time”

We are all creatures of habit at some time or another. Holding our toothbrushes in the same hand day in day out is no exception. Many of us will use our brush with the very same routine every day, sidling it from one side of our mouth to another. Unless we are pro-active teeth cleaners, we will most likely spend a lot more time on the first minute of the teeth cleaning exercise than the last minute, meaning that the place we start this daily routine in will most likely get more attention than anywhere else in the mouth. This is a dangerous practice to get into. It’s like the pesky mosquito which always knows which part of your flesh you expose on a hot sultry night and makes a beeline for it to get its daily feed.

Read more…

Toothbrushing

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5

Orthodontics

Tooth brushing Mistake No.5: “Not Brushing Correctly”

Did you ever think there was a better way to brush your teeth? Do you just whisk around your mouth and teeth with a toothbrush with a dab of fluoridated toothpaste on it? There is more to teeth brushing than that. For a start, you should position your toothbrush at a 45o angle to your gum line and then brush your teeth in a diagonal motion – not just up and down – as this does little to remove all that damaging plaque and clinging bacteria. You should also ensure that you manipulate your toothbrush onto the inner sides of your upper and lower teeth as well as the easy to reach front lower and upper teeth.

Read more…

Toothbrushing

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 4

Orthodontics

Tooth brushing Mistake No.4: “Brushing Too Often or Too Hard”

Research conducted at a leading U.S. university identified that there was no real evidence that brushing teeth extra hard with a toothbrush led to cleaner and whiter teeth. In fact, the opposite was found to be true.  Brushing too hard could well damage the layer on the surface of the teeth that would otherwise protect the teeth. Damage to the gums could also occur as well. A scientific method was designed that discovered that while brushing for the recommended 120 seconds, the pressure that should be applied by the toothbrush should be equal to an average sized orange. It was found that if the pressure went beyond this, the amount of plaque remaining on the teeth was about the same.

Read more…

Toothbrushing

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 3

Orthodontics

Tooth brushing Mistake No.3: “Not Brushing Often Enough or Long Enough”

How many of us take teeth brushing so seriously that we count the minutes or seconds every time we go through the routine. I wouldn’t think that too many of us have a stopwatch at hand for that purpose. Maybe we should. The American Dental Association firmly advises the American public to adhere to the 120 second rule every time one of us dabs our toothbrush with toothpaste. It is not simply the seconds we count throughout our daily brush but the number of times a day the stopwatch is set matters too. Twice daily is the expected frequency these days although some over exuberant people might even get around to three times daily.

Read more…

Toothbrushing Mistake

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 2

Orthodontics

Tooth brushing Mistake No.2: “Not Picking the Right Bristles”

Toothbrush bristles come in a variety of forms and are designed for a variety of purposes. Many dentists have a preference for soft bristled toothbrushes and if any of their patients have sensitive teeth or gums, there are extra-soft bristles available too. Softer bristles are kinder to the teeth and if used correctly can do a good job at removing stubborn food particles and cleaning the surface of teeth so that plaque has a more difficult time at adhering to the teeth’s surfaces.  Some individuals prefer the softer bristle varieties while others who do not have sensitive teeth or gums may choose a toothbrush with firmer bristles. Whatever we choose or prefer, the experts still recommend using a toothbrush with soft bristles or one with extra soft bristles.

Read more…